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A Coalition Driven Campaign

Regenerate America™ is an unprecedented coalition of farmers, businesses, nonprofits, and individuals from every corner of our country and all political stripes. Together, we are elevating the voices of farmers and ranchers demanding that the 2023 Farm Bill shift resources & support towards regenerative agriculture.

Regenerate America™ is about empowering farmers to rebuild our soil

Through the widespread adoption of regenerative agriculture, we can bring prosperity to rural communities for this generation and generations to come, while improving food and water security and strengthening our climate resilience. This is the bipartisan issue of our time.

Regenerate America™ is convened by the national soil health nonprofit organization, Kiss the Ground.

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Regenerate America™ Intended Outcomes

regenerated soils
regenerated economics
regenerated communities
regenerated health

Regenerate America™ Policy Priorities

Please email policy@kisstheground.com for a detailed copy of the policy priorities.
  • Priority #1
  • Priority #2
  • Priority #3
  • Priority #4
  • Priority #5
  • Priority #6

Expand & Refine Education, Technical Service & Implementation Assistance

Target Outcomes

regenerated soils
regenerated economics

Our current conventional agriculture education and technical assistance systems are not adequately addressing the fact that the average farm in America is losing over 5.8 tons of topsoil per acre per year, facing historic losses from flooding and drought, and adding 4% to farm debt annually. America’s farmers, and the institutions that support them, need urgent access to updated education that promotes resilient, healthy soil and the transition to regenerative agriculture, based on the latest cutting-edge science and context-based principles for climate adaptation. Education, not only for farmers and ranchers, but also for USDA, Technical Service Providers, Extension services, and other educators, and expanded implementation assistance, are critically important tools for regenerating American agriculture. This must include education not only for cropping systems, but also for the regenerative management of pasture and rangeland systems, with an emphasis on the opportunities for the integration of crops and animals. Soil health-focused education is the first essential step in rebuilding the resilience of our family farms, while rebuilding soils, restoring biodiversity, replenishing fresh water sources, and sequestering carbon.

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Make regenerative agriculture and soil health education and training required for all relevant USDA staff (prioritizing NRCS, RMA & FSA), and available to all Technical Service Providers (TSPs), land-grant universities, conservation districts, and other extension services.
  2. Make regenerative agriculture and soil health education and training available to all farmers and ranchers, and provide incentives to encourage farmer engagement.
  3. Expand funding for, access to, and farmer enrollment in, existing USDA working lands conservation programs, and prioritize conservation practices that result in land regeneration, and ensure an emphasis on holistically-managed, pasture-based livestock systems and integrated crop-livestock systems. 

Relates to Farm Bill Titles: II (Conservation) and VII (Research, Extension and Related Matters).

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Ensure Equitable Opportunity & Access to All USDA Programs

Target Outcomes

regenerated economics
regenerated communities

The widespread adoption of soil health and regenerative agriculture requires that USDA programs provide equal opportunity and access to all producers. Historically underserved producers (BIPOC, tribal, women, beginning, limited resource, and veteran farmers and ranchers) as well as small farms are often more likely to use soil health principles in their operations, but face barriers in accessing government programs and support. As a result, historically underserved producers and small operations struggle to access and retain farmland, and have to fight to start out and keep up in the farming business. By removing barriers and improving equitable funding, education, and access to all USDA programs, the Farm Bill can support the rapid adoption of soil health practices on a wide variety of diversified farms and ranches, and prepare USDA to serve the next generation of producers, addressing injustices and advancing both regeneration and equity.

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Support hiring and training at USDA to ensure employees, with a focus on field staff and technical assistance providers, have adequate and relevant knowledge to best serve historically underserved producers.
  2. Strengthen access and outreach for USDA programs to better serve historically underserved producers and small farms, leading to more equitable access to implement regenerative agricultural practices.

Relates to Farm Bill Titles: II (Conservation) and XII (Miscellaneous)

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Improve Regional Access to Infrastructure, Processing & Markets

Target Outcomes

regenerated economics
regenerated health

Investing in local and regional access to infrastructure, processing and markets will help regenerative producers make new products (livestock or specialty crops) available for market and meet the increasing consumer demand for regenerative products, while reducing foreign supply chain dependence and  increasing domestic food supply, bringing economic gains to transitioning farmers. The current lack of access to processing and local markets for producers is preventing a huge opportunity to increase net farm or ranch profitability and keep more food dollars inside local economies. Increasing access will allow more farmers to integrate livestock or specialty crops into their cropping systems and practice management intensive rotational grazing (building soil health and reducing reliance on chemical inputs), while improving public health and providing local food security during times of crisis.

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Invest in local and regional processing and distribution infrastructure (such as meat processing facilities and mills), equipment and training for successful operation. 
  2. Remove barriers to participation in local and regional markets by adjusting regulations and providing business and technical assistance to level the field for small and regenerative producers. 

Relates to Farm Bill Titles: VI (Rural Development) and X (Horticulture)

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Increase Access to Healthy & Regionally Sourced Food

Target Outcomes

regenerated communities
regenerated health

Current federal nutrition programs benefit large producers and corporate retailers over small producers and local markets. By shifting purchasing power to within regional, regenerative systems, nutrition programs can increase access to fresh, healthy, grown-in-America food, while driving larger direct markets for regenerative producers. Federal nutrition programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), increase access to food for millions of American families and are the leading federal programs helping to lift Americans out of poverty. The Nutrition Title (IV) receives three quarters of total Farm Bill funding, and thus is a major leverage point for driving regenerative food systems.

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Improve federal nutrition and food distribution programs to better support local and small-scale producers.
  2. Improve access to healthy, local food for food insecure households through federal nutrition programs.

Relates to Farm Bill Title: IV (Nutrition)

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Increase Farmland Preservation & Access, Including for Historically Underserved Producers

Target Outcomes

regenerated communities
regenerated soils

Secure land access is the number one challenge facing young and aspiring farmers. With as many as 400 million acres of farmland expected to change hands in the coming years, we need to ensure that this land not only remains in production and accessible to small- and medium-scale producers, but that it also supports a regenerative agriculture system. However, record high land prices (more than doubling over the last decade), increasing land consolidation by corporations and foreign-owned investment funds, conversion for development (over 2,000 acres per day), limited credit access, student debt, and a lack of technical assistance, put land access out of reach for many BIPOC, tribal, women, young, and beginning farmers who plan to farm regeneratively. In addition, farmers and ranchers who rent land (accounting for 40 percent of all working lands) face unique barriers to implementing soil health practices. Key policies can help to increase land access and ownership, support farm viability and keep farmland in production, and facilitate secure land tenure for the next generation of farmers and ranchers to participate in building a resilient agricultural system. 

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Keep farmland in production and strengthen succession planning to incentivize regenerative transition. 
  2. Increase land access for producers who are or are planning to use regenerative agriculture, especially BIPOC, women, small, and beginning farmers and ranchers, and particularly owner-operators, and increase pathways to secure tenure and ownership for farmer renters. 

Relates to Farm Bill Titles: II (Conservation), V (Credit) and XII (Miscellaneous) 

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Incentivize Soil Health & Risk Mitigation Through Federal Crop Insurance & Lending

Target Outcomes

regenerated economics
regenerated soils

The finance and insurance products that farmers rely on have immense potential to support a transition to regenerative agriculture, but current policies have created a system that often undermines, or even actively prevents, common sense soil health practices that reduce risk on farms – resulting in large scale soil loss and land degradation at an enormous cost to US taxpayers. Crop insurance and lending policy must be adjusted to support regenerative agriculture by removing outdated barriers and creating incentives that recognize the risk-reduction benefits of soil health and conservation management practices.

Summary of Policy Requests:

  1. Crop Insurance: Remove barriers and expand incentives for producers to adopt risk-reducing soil health/conservation practices and more diversified operations. 
  2. Lending: Develop incentives (such as lower rates, loan deferments and flexible terms) that fast track and vastly expand the viability of a large-scale transition to regenerative agriculture. 

Relates to Farm Bill Titles: V (Credit) and XI (Crop Insurance) 

Email policy@kisstheground.com for a draft copy of the full policy recommendations.

Regenerate America™ Theory of Change

RA™ Theory of Change
The Regenerate America™ Coalition will influence key policymakers in Washington, D.C. to robustly integrate regenerative agriculture into the 2023 Farm Bill, thereby empowering farmers & ranchers to rebuild our soil.

This will be accomplished by uplifting the voices of American farmers and ranchers, including support for small and historically underserved producer, and supporting and activating grassroots efforts that demonstrate the importance of this issue in key policymakers’ districts.

These efforts will be prioritized around key districts, and championed by coalition members with a series of creative national and regional engagements that bring ongoing excitement and awareness around regenerative agriculture, creating a groundswell of support around the movement.